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Title:

TSGA IPA: Comparative susceptibility and host responses of endemic fishes and salmonids affected by amoebic gill disease in Tasmania

Project Number:

2011-070

Organisation:

University of Tasmania (UTAS)

Principal Investigator:

Mark Adams

Project Status:

Completed

FRDC Expenditure:

$227,357.00

Program(s):

Industry

Final Report - 2011-070-DLD Atlantic Salmon Aquaculture Subprogram: Comparative susceptibility and host responses of endemic fishes and salmonids affected by amoebic gill disease in Tasmania

Final Report
ISBN:978-1-86295-854-8
ISSN:
Author(s):Mark Adams
Date Published:August 2016

Principle Investgator: Mark Adams

Keywords: Atlantic Salmon, amoebic gill disease, AGD, Neoparamoeba, yelloweye mullet, sand flathead, purple wrasse, Australian salmon, brown trout, rainbow trout, hybrid vigour.

Summary: Scientists at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies have completed a two year experimental project on a globally emerging fish disease. Dr Mark Adams and co-investigators Dr Andrew Bridle and Professor Barbara Nowak investigated the comparative susceptibility and host responses of various endemic and salmonid fishes to amoebic gill disease (AGD). The research, conducted at the University of Tasmania’s aquaculture research facility in Launceston, found that yellow eye mullet were able to spontaneously resolve pathological signs of AGD under experimental conditions. A tempered disease response to experimental infection with the causative agent Neoparamoeba perurans was demonstrated in other native species including Australian salmon, purple wrasse and southern sand flathead.

The disease has affected Tasmanian salmonid aquaculture since its inception three decades ago. AGD has become an increasingly complex management issue as the industry expands and the condition has recently emerged worldwide affecting major producers in the northern hemisphere. It is anticipated that the identification of fish species resistant to or tolerant of AGD will provide insight and linkage toward alternative treatments or prophylaxis for farmed Atlantic salmon.

 

 

 

Final Report - 2011-070-DLD Atlantic Salmon Aquaculture Subprogram: Comparative susceptibility and host responses of endemic fishes and salmonids affected by amoebic gill disease in Tasmania

Final Report
ISBN:978-1-86295-854-8
ISSN:
Author(s):Mark Adams
Date Published:August 2016

Principle Investgator: Mark Adams

Keywords: Atlantic Salmon, amoebic gill disease, AGD, Neoparamoeba, yelloweye mullet, sand flathead, purple wrasse, Australian salmon, brown trout, rainbow trout, hybrid vigour.

Summary: Scientists at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies have completed a two year experimental project on a globally emerging fish disease. Dr Mark Adams and co-investigators Dr Andrew Bridle and Professor Barbara Nowak investigated the comparative susceptibility and host responses of various endemic and salmonid fishes to amoebic gill disease (AGD). The research, conducted at the University of Tasmania’s aquaculture research facility in Launceston, found that yellow eye mullet were able to spontaneously resolve pathological signs of AGD under experimental conditions. A tempered disease response to experimental infection with the causative agent Neoparamoeba perurans was demonstrated in other native species including Australian salmon, purple wrasse and southern sand flathead.

The disease has affected Tasmanian salmonid aquaculture since its inception three decades ago. AGD has become an increasingly complex management issue as the industry expands and the condition has recently emerged worldwide affecting major producers in the northern hemisphere. It is anticipated that the identification of fish species resistant to or tolerant of AGD will provide insight and linkage toward alternative treatments or prophylaxis for farmed Atlantic salmon.

 

 

 

Objectives

1. Determine the susceptibility of sea-cage associated endemic fishes to amoebic gill disease in comparison to Atlantic salmon

2. Investigate the comparative host responses of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout naive and previously exposed to amoebic gill disease.